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Excuse me, sir. I think there's been a mistake. I know we're in detention, but, I don't think I belong here.


When we are first introduced to Brett Shimura, he is a popular student at East High School. He doesn't consider the kinds of social clubs that he's part of the same as academic clubs or anything lame like that. Brett thinks he's above everyone else, and this is his biggest problem. Thankfully, after befriending Troy Bolton and the gang, Brett has slowly lost his snobbish and self-centered attitude he had at the beginning of the show and has adopted new interests, such as being outdoors and caring for others.

Although we don't get to see Brett's background or home-life, we are shown and told from other characters that he comes from a wealthy family and is highly popular at East High. You learn a lot about the stereotype and insight of Brett's life from the character of Chad Danforth who continuously mocks and harasses Brett for being popular and spoilt and that ‘the school would probably shut down’ if he wasn't there. This is consistent with the stereotype of being wealthy, attractive and popular and mainly in an exclusive clique, although the character growth of Brett is shown throughout the show. At the beginning of the series, Brett is shown as conceited and not wanting to communicate with any of the four other misfits, other than the one character that is in the same clique as him. He even goes out of his way to ask their principal, “Excuse me, sir. I think there's been a mistake. I know we're in detention but I don't think I belong here.” This quote suggests that he doesn't think he should have to spend time with the teenagers in detention and that it isn’t fair for his to have to be there. Even though Brett appears self-centred, snobbish and selfish, he is a good friend. Throughout Season 1, he was extremely shy, but as the group started to open up about their lives, so did Brett.

A humanistic psychologist would say Brett's behavior is a result of his desire to reach self-actualization and his need for positive regard from others. Brett admits to acting the way he does because it is the way his friends want him to be. He feels he is expected, by his friends and parents, to be an attractive boy who wants to shop. A psychologist from the sociocultural school of psychology would say Brett's behavior was a reflection of the demands, expectations and assumptions of society. There is a lot of stereo typing in high school. A cognitive psychologist would blame Brett's snobby, stuck-up behavior on his desire to model the bad behavior of his friends. He expresses without guilt the fact that after their bonding during detention, the kids would never be able real friends because they were all from different social cliques and he would never dare to challenge the status quo. He also could have been subconsciously modeling the fake, bad behavior of his parents. They won Brett over with material things and felt that one parent could be better than the other depending on what material things they could buy for their daughter. This is not a normal, healthy family situation. Thus this may have caused some internal conflict in Brett, and could have influenced him to value material things over real personal relationships.

However, when Troy comes along, we are allowed to see the true Brett shining through the poorly constructed mask of conformity. Troy nurtures Brett to become more himself through encouragement and a gift of awesomeness. However, the importance of this talent pales beside the personal qualities Brett is finally allowing himself to acknowledge. He has the sensitivity and kindness that would probably be at odds with the "loner" image almost everyone seems to see him as. Through his friendship with Troy, Brett truly manages to find himself. But with Troy in his life, Brett seems to have enough permission to want to be himself and to stand up for himself. As Brett's new friend, Troy yearned to reach out and capture the quivering life about Brett but when he tried, it slipped past his fingertips, leaving Brett depressed. Troy is the one who helps Brett see "the awesomeness in himself". With Troy in his life, Brett is able to start to shape a more confident version of himself, beyond his parents' expectations. Obviously Brett's friendship with Troy alters him tremendously. For being a mere sophomore at East High, Troy really teaches Brett to be more courageous, more imaginative, and more himself. Because he has Troy in his life, Brett can exercise his generosity and become more fully himself, despite his parents' disapproval and judgement. His friendship with Troy makes up for the things that are lacking in his family life, and, just as Troy would be alienated without him, Brett would be "lonesome" without him. He's able to be Troy's one whole friend in the world as Troy is his. When Brett tells Troy that he isn't loved by anyone, it might not be with any real intent, but the pain Brett is feeling is very real. One of his biggest problems that is introduced right along with him are his struggles with school. Brett explains that he is being pressured by his parents to get good grades at school, yet seems to be unable to do so, despite studying hard. When Brett began questioning his intelligence, it is revealed that his grades are merely a result of him having a learning disability.

Brett provides the conflict for the drama part of the story. His transition to East High from Pilot will cause a ripple effect amidst being the main storyline and will be a major plot-point all throughout the show. He has the biggest role all over the story and without him there would be no story to begin with. 


Physical Appearance

Brett Shimura is a very attractive Asian-American boy of medium height, around 5'4" tall. He has large and widely-spaced dark chocolate brown eyes, black hair — combed well to the left side, with lush pouty lips, glasses and has olive skin.

Brett's clothing style isn't too fancy. He prefers to keep it comfortable, and functional if he can. Usually this includes a t-shirt, some plain blue or black jeans, and some shoes. Also Brett will often seen wearing a Disney shirt. There is one thing that he wears at all times, and that is a silver chain as a necklace.


Personality and Traits

Do you know how popular I am? I am so popular. Everybody loves me so much at this school.


From his first introduction, at first glance, Brett Shimura is shallow, snobbish, and spoiled. It's a time in his life when looks mean almost everything, and status makes up for just about everything else. He manages to not care what others around him see him as, as long as he remains at the top. For Brett Shimura, looking good at all times matters a lot. He puts in a lot of effort to look presentable at any time, despite him not having designer clothes. He is a boy who has an obsession with beauty; spending his time admiring himself at a mirror on ensuring his own physical beauty. He is also fairly narcissistic given the way he looks down on others. Yet he also had a very bitter outlook on his life, and was quick to become frustrated and pitch a fit when things did not work his way, showing a spoiled side to his personality. Though these sides of his personality seemed contradictory, they both stemmed from his upbringing as a snob, since his privileged life made him selfish and inconsiderate during the first-half of the show, and also led to his hospitality to others. Brett is portrayed as being just as pompous and arrogant as Sharpay Evans. Like Sharpay, Brett craves to be the center of everyone's attention and exhibits no concern for others' well-being aside from the extent that doing so reinforces his bloated ego. However, his character is fleshed out considerably shortly after Pilot, showing that, while he is a jerk obsessed with status, he is more interested in finding somebody who will love him for who he is. While he is indeed ungrateful and rather ugly in the first episode, Brett is portrayed as being merely plain (compared to the beauty of Troy Bolton) rather than ugly as he becomes a more sympathetic character.

Yet, he is a flawed character. He has a lot of doubt, anger, frustration, uncertainty, and sadness, despite being popular. But despite his jumbled negative emotions, Brett is a warm and loving character down to his core. School and peers had a huge impact on him. He needs to be cruel to other people so he can feel confident. Brett acts only to impress others, not for what he actually wants. The popular people that have surrounded him for the majority of his life have been so influential in how he is seen by everyone, that he only wants people to think he is perfect and does not do what really makes him happy. Brett realizes that what his friends have taught him is popularity will not honestly make him happy and this is how they have had a significant impact on him. This is understandable, due to the fact, he puts on a jerk-ass façade to make it appear as if he is better than everyone else. He may want love as ardently as anyone, but he masks his soft heart behind a wall of ice. For all his spitefulness, in Pilot, sure, he is entitled, but in truth he is just fearful, trying to intimidate people. Brett explains to the group the pressures he feels and how he always feels as if he must always look good and be the most attractive boy in school. He also explains how it's hard to be popular; how he must not do certain things or talk to certain people – showing the pressures that he feels to have to stay above certain people and groups. In this particular scene, as the characters learn more about him, Brett reveals that though he's conceited and snobbish, he hates always having to conform to his friends' ideas but feels too peer-pressured to rebel against his mindset, for fear of becoming a social outcast and not belonging anywhere: “I hate it. I hate having to go along with everything my friends say.” On the surface, it appears ridiculous and unreal, but underneath, it is one of the most profound statements that he makes. What Brett truly means is that he himself is a useless little boy following an extravagantly normal routine day after day. In order to survive in a high status world, Brett either had to ignore those less of him entirely and never talk to or become a poor and meek person. Brett wished this curse of false happiness upon himself, because it is all he will ever know.

The way Brett is treated at home effects his thoughts and feelings about his self-worth which leads to him seeking approval from others. This shows that his behavior, internal thoughts, and his environment are all contributing factors to his personality. This all makes Brett seem hugely insecure. This loneliness has at times caused his romantic interest in someone to become a bit unsettling, as seen during the course of his crush with Troy. But despite his flaws, he remains to be a very passionate and caring young man and loves his friends dearly. His parents fight constantly and he feels that they use him against one and other in their arguments. Brett's parents do not actually care about his needs, but instead attempt to buy him love and appease him with material items.

I was spoiled, self-centered and you guys really took care of me.


Befriending Troy and the gang was the best thing that could happen for Brett and his self-worth. He learns that he has value outside of just what he looks like, and when he begins to care for another character, it serves to teach him how real human interactions are more rewarding and mutually beneficial than feedback from a phone screen. In the beginning of the series, Brett is unconcerned about others well-being. Considering that he's presumably wealthy, it's understandable why Brett displays such a spoiled and entitled attitude. He is conceited and shallow because he feels empty inside due to his parents being psychologically abusive, with a side of neglect, and only uses him as a weapon to get back at each other.

This repentant act earned his forgiveness from everyone, particularly Troy himself, telling him everyone deserves love. He's genuinely trying to turn over a new leaf, taking art lessons, talking to other students and generally being a nice person. Brett seems to have finally opened completely about his feelings, sexuality, and thoughts. He has developed a much more carefree personality, to the point that he is now considered to be proud of who he is. Brett has gained enough strength and sense of self-worth through his friendship with Troy to carry on without him and not lose touch with all Troy has taught him. Brett is a different person after Troy, and it is apparent that he will be more successful in his world because of Troy. He sees Troy as “his other, more exciting self”.


Role in Series

Pilot

When Brett Shimura first emerged from a van, he laughed as he rounded around the vehicle. "Hey, Brett! Don't forget these." a male voice called to his friend. Brett, having heard his name, spun around. "Oh, yeah. I keep trying to." Brett teased, stopping in front of the driver seat, getting his glasses from his friend.
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"I like it. It's very Lisa Loeb." the friend joked. "Oh, well, you know.... I'd like to be very... Brett." Brett said as he shifted his body away from the van. "Oi, I'll see ya at lunch, all right?" the friend called out. "Yeah, I'll be there." Brett assured.


The Start of Something New

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Get'cha Head in the Game

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What I've Been Looking For

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Stick to the Status Quo

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When There Was Me and You

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Bop to the Top

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Breaking Free

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We're All In This Together

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What Time Is It?

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Fabulous

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Work This Out

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You Are The Music In Me

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I Don't Dance

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Gotta Go My Own Way

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Bet On It

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Everyday

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All For One

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Now or Never

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Right Here, Right Now

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I Want It All

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Can I Have This Dance

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A Night To Remember

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Just Wanna Be With You

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The Boys Are Back

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Walk Away

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Scream

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We're All In This Together

The episode gives us a little insight as to what happened in the moments we weren't privy to in the Pilot. In the direct-to-video "parallel Season 1" Season 2, Brett makes a few brief, non-speaking appearances in the scenes for which he was present in the Pilot.


It'll be a few more minutes until he actually meets Troy.


High School Musical

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Trivia

  • Many see Brett Shimura as a popular boy with good-looks, but, spoiled personality, and lots of money. Although, this is just how the school sees him, what many do not know is that Brett struggles with day-to-day pressures just like the others do, although they are in different ways.
  • Deconstructed beautifully with Brett Shimura, complete with an excuse. Particularly interesting about the deconstruction was how the characters pointed out that Brett is really not the one in charge at all, and he feels miserably forced into the behavior he is so notorious for.
    • Due to Brett's narcissistic personality disorder, he has moderate difficulty functioning in social and school environments due to stressors such as; peer-pressure to be popular and maintaining attractiveness.
    • He still grapples with narcissism as it is a defense mechanism as a result of his parents' deteriorating marriage. When he is treated properly, he should be functioning healthily and driven to think about others instead of self.
  • Believes that others are envious of him. Since he is so popular he believes everyone in school liked him.
    • Brett's troubles may stem from unconscious conflicts, wishes, impulses, and adverse childhood experiences, receive counseling to analyze his distressing thoughts and feelings and recurring themes and life patterns.
  • Brett doesn't really know who he is because for so long, he has just done what was expected of him. He goes along with whatever his friends say (as revealed in Pilot), even though he admits that he hates it. Because, he has suppressed his feelings for the sake of others, Brett does not have a strong grip of a personal identity.
    • Also in this level, the individual becomes aware of the wider rules of society, which Brett has already begun to recognize, which is why he acts the way he does, because of the unspoken rules of society.
    • Just because he's one of the students at the top of the social food chain in his high school hierarchy, that doesn't mean the other popular kids hold him in any regard; on the contrary, Brett is little more than a glorified slave to peer-pressure. He acts like a jerk towards others because he's afraid of being rejected by his other popular friends. Though underneath it all, he really is a kind-hearted person.
    • His drama partially stems from the fact that his friends pressure him to be unkind to the unpopular kids.
  • Brett wants people to like him, he says that he was so popular and everybody loved him at his old school before attending East High. He wants people to think of him in a good way.
    • Brett is the classic image of popularity in the face of the media. He thinks that trying to be perfect will make people like him, when he should just be the person that he truly is.
    • His spoiled upbringing gives him a sense of entitlement, believing that he is above others.
    • His coming-of-age process has been stifled due to his sheltered and shallow home-life. In addition to this, Brett is very concerned with popularity and is concerned solely with maintaining his status and gaining his friends' approval.
    • School and peers have a huge impact on Brett. He acts only to impress others, not for what he actually wants. The popular people that have surrounded him for the majority of his life have been so influential in how he is seen by everyone, that he only wants people to think he is perfect and does not do what really makes him happy. He admits this when he says, "I hate it. I hate having to go along with everything my friends say."
    • Brett realizes that what his new friends have taught him is succumbing to peer-pressure may make you popular, but it won't make you happy.
  • He is extremely self-conscious of how he is perceived by others. Despite having little regard for those around him, his peace of mind hinges on receiving recognition of his self-importance from others.
    • Brett doesn't mince words when stating his opinions, like postulating that no one out of his clique would speak to anyone due to fear of breaking the status quo.
    • On the upside, Brett's obsession with projecting an image of infallibility renders him capable of internalizing at least some set of moral guidelines.
  • It soon becomes clear that he comes from the way he is treated at home effects his thoughts and feelings about his self-worth which leads to him seeking approval from others (as seen in Pilot).
  • He has (or had) romantic feelings for Troy (as seen in Pilot).
    • In the first episode of Season 1 at Chad's house party, in a drunk behavior, Brett had an eye on Troy. The vulnerable and drunk Brett tried every way possible to seduce the jock. He made sure Troy got the best possible look at his attributes. Brett coos and pouts and makes suggestive comments. His seductive behavior does not work, as Troy continues to think of him in a platonic sense. However, Troy was flattered.
    • It is unclear exactly when Brett's romantic feelings for Troy stopped, but as of Season 2 the feelings change from a crush into a brotherly bond, which has strengthened as the show progressed.
  • Considered one of the cutest characters of the series.
  • Despite his need for glasses he is not a nerd at all. And Brett manages to look cute with them on.